Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans
Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans
Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans
Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans
Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans
Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans
Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans
Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans
Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans
Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Pen and Ink on paper
Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.
Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”
Works
1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto
2. Mother and Child 
3. No Hope
4.Head
5. Bird/Wing Series
6. Chicken Series
7. Afro Images
8.Male Nude with goat
9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”
10. Africans

Ezrom Kgobonyane Sebata Legae AKA Ezrom Legae

Country: Republic of South Africa

Style: Abstract Expressionism

Medium: Pen and Ink on paper

Fun Fact: Legae is best known for his powerful visual commentaries on the pathos and degradation of apartheid - a critique he extended to the persistence of poverty and racism in the post-apartheid years.

Quote: “I will continue to talk about things as I see them. People can change, but masters cannot. Change doesn’t happen overnight”

Works

1. Mangy Dogs of Soweto

2. Mother and Child 

3. No Hope

4.Head

5. Bird/Wing Series

6. Chicken Series

7. Afro Images

8.Male Nude with goat

9. Icons De Dakar “Africa”

10. Africans

Diezel 
Country: Republic of South Africa via Kenya and Australia
Style: Afro-Pop Art
Fun Fact: Superstroke Pop Artist, Diezel was born on a farm in South Africa, lived and sculpted in Kenya and is now a resident of Australia where she works from a studio in Sydney.
She has painted since childhood and picked up her artist name at university.  She feels that growing up in Africa was a special privilege and fuelled a wild imagination. She has travelled extensively and feels particularly inspired by cultural societies, political issues and people’s belief systems.
Diezel admires the work of the Pop Artists of the Sixties, Jean-Michel Basquat and Lichtenstein and that influence can be seen in her work.  She uses animals as metaphors for humans and employs irony to provoke a deeper understanding of the complex world we live in.  The scribbles and and drippings in her work confronts the paradigm of social, political and cultural issues, with Africa often as the backdrop.
Quote: “My work is influenced by the vulnerability of people, their situations, emotions and their beliefs. I use dripping paint and scribbles to symbolise experience and  animals who are metaphors for the complex conditions humans exist in.”
more at http://diezelart.com/
Diezel 
Country: Republic of South Africa via Kenya and Australia
Style: Afro-Pop Art
Fun Fact: Superstroke Pop Artist, Diezel was born on a farm in South Africa, lived and sculpted in Kenya and is now a resident of Australia where she works from a studio in Sydney.
She has painted since childhood and picked up her artist name at university.  She feels that growing up in Africa was a special privilege and fuelled a wild imagination. She has travelled extensively and feels particularly inspired by cultural societies, political issues and people’s belief systems.
Diezel admires the work of the Pop Artists of the Sixties, Jean-Michel Basquat and Lichtenstein and that influence can be seen in her work.  She uses animals as metaphors for humans and employs irony to provoke a deeper understanding of the complex world we live in.  The scribbles and and drippings in her work confronts the paradigm of social, political and cultural issues, with Africa often as the backdrop.
Quote: “My work is influenced by the vulnerability of people, their situations, emotions and their beliefs. I use dripping paint and scribbles to symbolise experience and  animals who are metaphors for the complex conditions humans exist in.”
more at http://diezelart.com/
Diezel 
Country: Republic of South Africa via Kenya and Australia
Style: Afro-Pop Art
Fun Fact: Superstroke Pop Artist, Diezel was born on a farm in South Africa, lived and sculpted in Kenya and is now a resident of Australia where she works from a studio in Sydney.
She has painted since childhood and picked up her artist name at university.  She feels that growing up in Africa was a special privilege and fuelled a wild imagination. She has travelled extensively and feels particularly inspired by cultural societies, political issues and people’s belief systems.
Diezel admires the work of the Pop Artists of the Sixties, Jean-Michel Basquat and Lichtenstein and that influence can be seen in her work.  She uses animals as metaphors for humans and employs irony to provoke a deeper understanding of the complex world we live in.  The scribbles and and drippings in her work confronts the paradigm of social, political and cultural issues, with Africa often as the backdrop.
Quote: “My work is influenced by the vulnerability of people, their situations, emotions and their beliefs. I use dripping paint and scribbles to symbolise experience and  animals who are metaphors for the complex conditions humans exist in.”
more at http://diezelart.com/
Diezel 
Country: Republic of South Africa via Kenya and Australia
Style: Afro-Pop Art
Fun Fact: Superstroke Pop Artist, Diezel was born on a farm in South Africa, lived and sculpted in Kenya and is now a resident of Australia where she works from a studio in Sydney.
She has painted since childhood and picked up her artist name at university.  She feels that growing up in Africa was a special privilege and fuelled a wild imagination. She has travelled extensively and feels particularly inspired by cultural societies, political issues and people’s belief systems.
Diezel admires the work of the Pop Artists of the Sixties, Jean-Michel Basquat and Lichtenstein and that influence can be seen in her work.  She uses animals as metaphors for humans and employs irony to provoke a deeper understanding of the complex world we live in.  The scribbles and and drippings in her work confronts the paradigm of social, political and cultural issues, with Africa often as the backdrop.
Quote: “My work is influenced by the vulnerability of people, their situations, emotions and their beliefs. I use dripping paint and scribbles to symbolise experience and  animals who are metaphors for the complex conditions humans exist in.”
more at http://diezelart.com/
Diezel 
Country: Republic of South Africa via Kenya and Australia
Style: Afro-Pop Art
Fun Fact: Superstroke Pop Artist, Diezel was born on a farm in South Africa, lived and sculpted in Kenya and is now a resident of Australia where she works from a studio in Sydney.
She has painted since childhood and picked up her artist name at university.  She feels that growing up in Africa was a special privilege and fuelled a wild imagination. She has travelled extensively and feels particularly inspired by cultural societies, political issues and people’s belief systems.
Diezel admires the work of the Pop Artists of the Sixties, Jean-Michel Basquat and Lichtenstein and that influence can be seen in her work.  She uses animals as metaphors for humans and employs irony to provoke a deeper understanding of the complex world we live in.  The scribbles and and drippings in her work confronts the paradigm of social, political and cultural issues, with Africa often as the backdrop.
Quote: “My work is influenced by the vulnerability of people, their situations, emotions and their beliefs. I use dripping paint and scribbles to symbolise experience and  animals who are metaphors for the complex conditions humans exist in.”
more at http://diezelart.com/
Diezel 
Country: Republic of South Africa via Kenya and Australia
Style: Afro-Pop Art
Fun Fact: Superstroke Pop Artist, Diezel was born on a farm in South Africa, lived and sculpted in Kenya and is now a resident of Australia where she works from a studio in Sydney.
She has painted since childhood and picked up her artist name at university.  She feels that growing up in Africa was a special privilege and fuelled a wild imagination. She has travelled extensively and feels particularly inspired by cultural societies, political issues and people’s belief systems.
Diezel admires the work of the Pop Artists of the Sixties, Jean-Michel Basquat and Lichtenstein and that influence can be seen in her work.  She uses animals as metaphors for humans and employs irony to provoke a deeper understanding of the complex world we live in.  The scribbles and and drippings in her work confronts the paradigm of social, political and cultural issues, with Africa often as the backdrop.
Quote: “My work is influenced by the vulnerability of people, their situations, emotions and their beliefs. I use dripping paint and scribbles to symbolise experience and  animals who are metaphors for the complex conditions humans exist in.”
more at http://diezelart.com/
Diezel 
Country: Republic of South Africa via Kenya and Australia
Style: Afro-Pop Art
Fun Fact: Superstroke Pop Artist, Diezel was born on a farm in South Africa, lived and sculpted in Kenya and is now a resident of Australia where she works from a studio in Sydney.
She has painted since childhood and picked up her artist name at university.  She feels that growing up in Africa was a special privilege and fuelled a wild imagination. She has travelled extensively and feels particularly inspired by cultural societies, political issues and people’s belief systems.
Diezel admires the work of the Pop Artists of the Sixties, Jean-Michel Basquat and Lichtenstein and that influence can be seen in her work.  She uses animals as metaphors for humans and employs irony to provoke a deeper understanding of the complex world we live in.  The scribbles and and drippings in her work confronts the paradigm of social, political and cultural issues, with Africa often as the backdrop.
Quote: “My work is influenced by the vulnerability of people, their situations, emotions and their beliefs. I use dripping paint and scribbles to symbolise experience and  animals who are metaphors for the complex conditions humans exist in.”
more at http://diezelart.com/
Diezel 
Country: Republic of South Africa via Kenya and Australia
Style: Afro-Pop Art
Fun Fact: Superstroke Pop Artist, Diezel was born on a farm in South Africa, lived and sculpted in Kenya and is now a resident of Australia where she works from a studio in Sydney.
She has painted since childhood and picked up her artist name at university.  She feels that growing up in Africa was a special privilege and fuelled a wild imagination. She has travelled extensively and feels particularly inspired by cultural societies, political issues and people’s belief systems.
Diezel admires the work of the Pop Artists of the Sixties, Jean-Michel Basquat and Lichtenstein and that influence can be seen in her work.  She uses animals as metaphors for humans and employs irony to provoke a deeper understanding of the complex world we live in.  The scribbles and and drippings in her work confronts the paradigm of social, political and cultural issues, with Africa often as the backdrop.
Quote: “My work is influenced by the vulnerability of people, their situations, emotions and their beliefs. I use dripping paint and scribbles to symbolise experience and  animals who are metaphors for the complex conditions humans exist in.”
more at http://diezelart.com/

Diezel 

Country: Republic of South Africa via Kenya and Australia

Style: Afro-Pop Art

Fun Fact: Superstroke Pop Artist, Diezel was born on a farm in South Africa, lived and sculpted in Kenya and is now a resident of Australia where she works from a studio in Sydney.

She has painted since childhood and picked up her artist name at university.  She feels that growing up in Africa was a special privilege and fuelled a wild imagination. She has travelled extensively and feels particularly inspired by cultural societies, political issues and people’s belief systems.

Diezel admires the work of the Pop Artists of the Sixties, Jean-Michel Basquat and Lichtenstein and that influence can be seen in her work.  She uses animals as metaphors for humans and employs irony to provoke a deeper understanding of the complex world we live in.  The scribbles and and drippings in her work confronts the paradigm of social, political and cultural issues, with Africa often as the backdrop.

Quote: “My work is influenced by the vulnerability of people, their situations, emotions and their beliefs. I use dripping paint and scribbles to symbolise experience and  animals who are metaphors for the complex conditions humans exist in.”

more at http://diezelart.com/

David Nthubu Koloane  aka David Koloane
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Oil Pastel on paper
Fun Fact: In the artist’s paintings this claim for space is achieved with exuberance and pain to deploy township scenes of electrifying intensity. His subject matter is found in the frantic buzz of every day commuting, mass protests, high speed traffic and some intimate corners that make up the inner city experience. The colour-saturated expressionism of his images gives life to multitudes of faceless people sporting placards, women working the streets and mongrels fighting for their invisible bounty. Like muted music, the images evoke the restless speed and confusion of a complex socio-political landscape, and the multiple urban anxieties in permanent mutation.
Quote:  ‘Apartheid was a politics of space more than anything…and much of the apartheid legislation was denying people the right to move. It’s all about space; restricting space…Claiming art is also reclaiming space.’ 
David Nthubu Koloane  aka David Koloane
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Oil Pastel on paper
Fun Fact: In the artist’s paintings this claim for space is achieved with exuberance and pain to deploy township scenes of electrifying intensity. His subject matter is found in the frantic buzz of every day commuting, mass protests, high speed traffic and some intimate corners that make up the inner city experience. The colour-saturated expressionism of his images gives life to multitudes of faceless people sporting placards, women working the streets and mongrels fighting for their invisible bounty. Like muted music, the images evoke the restless speed and confusion of a complex socio-political landscape, and the multiple urban anxieties in permanent mutation.
Quote:  ‘Apartheid was a politics of space more than anything…and much of the apartheid legislation was denying people the right to move. It’s all about space; restricting space…Claiming art is also reclaiming space.’ 
David Nthubu Koloane  aka David Koloane
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Oil Pastel on paper
Fun Fact: In the artist’s paintings this claim for space is achieved with exuberance and pain to deploy township scenes of electrifying intensity. His subject matter is found in the frantic buzz of every day commuting, mass protests, high speed traffic and some intimate corners that make up the inner city experience. The colour-saturated expressionism of his images gives life to multitudes of faceless people sporting placards, women working the streets and mongrels fighting for their invisible bounty. Like muted music, the images evoke the restless speed and confusion of a complex socio-political landscape, and the multiple urban anxieties in permanent mutation.
Quote:  ‘Apartheid was a politics of space more than anything…and much of the apartheid legislation was denying people the right to move. It’s all about space; restricting space…Claiming art is also reclaiming space.’ 
David Nthubu Koloane  aka David Koloane
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Oil Pastel on paper
Fun Fact: In the artist’s paintings this claim for space is achieved with exuberance and pain to deploy township scenes of electrifying intensity. His subject matter is found in the frantic buzz of every day commuting, mass protests, high speed traffic and some intimate corners that make up the inner city experience. The colour-saturated expressionism of his images gives life to multitudes of faceless people sporting placards, women working the streets and mongrels fighting for their invisible bounty. Like muted music, the images evoke the restless speed and confusion of a complex socio-political landscape, and the multiple urban anxieties in permanent mutation.
Quote:  ‘Apartheid was a politics of space more than anything…and much of the apartheid legislation was denying people the right to move. It’s all about space; restricting space…Claiming art is also reclaiming space.’ 
David Nthubu Koloane  aka David Koloane
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Oil Pastel on paper
Fun Fact: In the artist’s paintings this claim for space is achieved with exuberance and pain to deploy township scenes of electrifying intensity. His subject matter is found in the frantic buzz of every day commuting, mass protests, high speed traffic and some intimate corners that make up the inner city experience. The colour-saturated expressionism of his images gives life to multitudes of faceless people sporting placards, women working the streets and mongrels fighting for their invisible bounty. Like muted music, the images evoke the restless speed and confusion of a complex socio-political landscape, and the multiple urban anxieties in permanent mutation.
Quote:  ‘Apartheid was a politics of space more than anything…and much of the apartheid legislation was denying people the right to move. It’s all about space; restricting space…Claiming art is also reclaiming space.’ 

David Nthubu Koloane  aka David Koloane

Country: Republic of South Africa

Style: Abstract Expressionism

Medium: Oil Pastel on paper

Fun Fact: In the artist’s paintings this claim for space is achieved with exuberance and pain to deploy township scenes of electrifying intensity. His subject matter is found in the frantic buzz of every day commuting, mass protests, high speed traffic and some intimate corners that make up the inner city experience. The colour-saturated expressionism of his images gives life to multitudes of faceless people sporting placards, women working the streets and mongrels fighting for their invisible bounty. Like muted music, the images evoke the restless speed and confusion of a complex socio-political landscape, and the multiple urban anxieties in permanent mutation.

Quote:  ‘Apartheid was a politics of space more than anything…and much of the apartheid legislation was denying people the right to move. It’s all about space; restricting space…Claiming art is also reclaiming space.’ 

Louis Khehla Maqhubela aka Louis Maqhubela
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Gouache, Watercolour, Conti and collage on paper
Fun Fact: His representations included figures, religious works, animals, birds and urban scenes. Often a single bird symbolised the unfettered spirit, which was a manifestation of oppression. By 1966, he began interpretation of philosophical and religious themes. From 1968, colour was the most important factor in his compositions, which were done in oil on paper.
His new work comprises abstract compositions, illuminated by floating colour shapes bound together by symbolic drawings of human and animal forms. His designs are scattered randomly over the canvas as he scratches paint down to the surface of the paper or canvas. Since 1990, his work shows a greater abstraction and non-figurative style. This intense symbolism results in an individuality, making him
one of South Africas’ foremost painters.
Quote:
Paintings
Louis Khehla Maqhubela aka Louis Maqhubela
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Gouache, Watercolour, Conti and collage on paper
Fun Fact: His representations included figures, religious works, animals, birds and urban scenes. Often a single bird symbolised the unfettered spirit, which was a manifestation of oppression. By 1966, he began interpretation of philosophical and religious themes. From 1968, colour was the most important factor in his compositions, which were done in oil on paper.
His new work comprises abstract compositions, illuminated by floating colour shapes bound together by symbolic drawings of human and animal forms. His designs are scattered randomly over the canvas as he scratches paint down to the surface of the paper or canvas. Since 1990, his work shows a greater abstraction and non-figurative style. This intense symbolism results in an individuality, making him
one of South Africas’ foremost painters.
Quote:
Paintings
Louis Khehla Maqhubela aka Louis Maqhubela
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Gouache, Watercolour, Conti and collage on paper
Fun Fact: His representations included figures, religious works, animals, birds and urban scenes. Often a single bird symbolised the unfettered spirit, which was a manifestation of oppression. By 1966, he began interpretation of philosophical and religious themes. From 1968, colour was the most important factor in his compositions, which were done in oil on paper.
His new work comprises abstract compositions, illuminated by floating colour shapes bound together by symbolic drawings of human and animal forms. His designs are scattered randomly over the canvas as he scratches paint down to the surface of the paper or canvas. Since 1990, his work shows a greater abstraction and non-figurative style. This intense symbolism results in an individuality, making him
one of South Africas’ foremost painters.
Quote:
Paintings
Louis Khehla Maqhubela aka Louis Maqhubela
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Gouache, Watercolour, Conti and collage on paper
Fun Fact: His representations included figures, religious works, animals, birds and urban scenes. Often a single bird symbolised the unfettered spirit, which was a manifestation of oppression. By 1966, he began interpretation of philosophical and religious themes. From 1968, colour was the most important factor in his compositions, which were done in oil on paper.
His new work comprises abstract compositions, illuminated by floating colour shapes bound together by symbolic drawings of human and animal forms. His designs are scattered randomly over the canvas as he scratches paint down to the surface of the paper or canvas. Since 1990, his work shows a greater abstraction and non-figurative style. This intense symbolism results in an individuality, making him
one of South Africas’ foremost painters.
Quote:
Paintings
Louis Khehla Maqhubela aka Louis Maqhubela
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Gouache, Watercolour, Conti and collage on paper
Fun Fact: His representations included figures, religious works, animals, birds and urban scenes. Often a single bird symbolised the unfettered spirit, which was a manifestation of oppression. By 1966, he began interpretation of philosophical and religious themes. From 1968, colour was the most important factor in his compositions, which were done in oil on paper.
His new work comprises abstract compositions, illuminated by floating colour shapes bound together by symbolic drawings of human and animal forms. His designs are scattered randomly over the canvas as he scratches paint down to the surface of the paper or canvas. Since 1990, his work shows a greater abstraction and non-figurative style. This intense symbolism results in an individuality, making him
one of South Africas’ foremost painters.
Quote:
Paintings
Louis Khehla Maqhubela aka Louis Maqhubela
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Gouache, Watercolour, Conti and collage on paper
Fun Fact: His representations included figures, religious works, animals, birds and urban scenes. Often a single bird symbolised the unfettered spirit, which was a manifestation of oppression. By 1966, he began interpretation of philosophical and religious themes. From 1968, colour was the most important factor in his compositions, which were done in oil on paper.
His new work comprises abstract compositions, illuminated by floating colour shapes bound together by symbolic drawings of human and animal forms. His designs are scattered randomly over the canvas as he scratches paint down to the surface of the paper or canvas. Since 1990, his work shows a greater abstraction and non-figurative style. This intense symbolism results in an individuality, making him
one of South Africas’ foremost painters.
Quote:
Paintings
Louis Khehla Maqhubela aka Louis Maqhubela
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Abstract Expressionism
Medium: Gouache, Watercolour, Conti and collage on paper
Fun Fact: His representations included figures, religious works, animals, birds and urban scenes. Often a single bird symbolised the unfettered spirit, which was a manifestation of oppression. By 1966, he began interpretation of philosophical and religious themes. From 1968, colour was the most important factor in his compositions, which were done in oil on paper.
His new work comprises abstract compositions, illuminated by floating colour shapes bound together by symbolic drawings of human and animal forms. His designs are scattered randomly over the canvas as he scratches paint down to the surface of the paper or canvas. Since 1990, his work shows a greater abstraction and non-figurative style. This intense symbolism results in an individuality, making him
one of South Africas’ foremost painters.
Quote:
Paintings

Louis Khehla Maqhubela aka Louis Maqhubela

Country: Republic of South Africa

Style: Abstract Expressionism

Medium: Gouache, Watercolour, Conti and collage on paper

Fun Fact: His representations included figures, religious works, animals, birds and urban scenes. Often a single bird symbolised the unfettered spirit, which was a manifestation of oppression. By 1966, he began interpretation of philosophical and religious themes. From 1968, colour was the most important factor in his compositions, which were done in oil on paper.

His new work comprises abstract compositions, illuminated by floating colour shapes bound together by symbolic drawings of human and animal forms. His designs are scattered randomly over the canvas as he scratches paint down to the surface of the paper or canvas. Since 1990, his work shows a greater abstraction and non-figurative style. This intense symbolism results in an individuality, making him

one of South Africas’ foremost painters.

Quote:

Paintings

Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works
Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works
Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works
Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works
Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works
Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works
Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works
Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works
Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works
Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba
Country: Republic of South Africa
Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist
Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper
Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.
Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

 See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf
Works

Dumile Feni aka Zwelidumile Jeremiah Mgxaji Feni Mhlaba

Country: Republic of South Africa

Style: Expressionist/ Figurative Realist

Medium: Pencil, Charcoal or Ink on paper

Fun Fact:Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning.

Quote: Dumile Feni was born in Worcester in Western Cape in South Africa at a time not known exactly. It is thought to have been between 1939 and 1944. South Africa was still marked by apartheid imposed by a white-minority government and maintained in the face of opposition by force and violence. Dissidents were suppressed and jailed, and black townships on the fringe of cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg were often run-down and riddled with crime. These were the conditions which Dumile’s works referred to. Since they recall Francisco Goya’s etchings of war and violence in the late 18th and early 19th century, Dumile was dubbed the ‘Goya of the Townships’ ’ an honor which he hardly enjoyed earning. -

See more at: http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=2542#sthash.ShE9221A.dpuf

Works