Angu Walters
Country: Cameroon
Style: Surrealism
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas
Fun Fact: His interest in painting started when he was a boy experimenting with ink from different pen colors, mixed and applied them on torn cardboards, which were sometimes hung on the walls of his mother’s sitting room. His mother invited Spee, a very famous artist to show him what the child was doing with the materials he could find in his milieu, thereafter the artist took him to his workshop, under his guidance so to better improve on his skills.
Quote:
Works
1.
2. Kora Player III
3. Mask
4. The Broken Bridge
5. The Fulani. The Cow. The Milk
6.  Sunshine in my mind
7.Knowledge is Power
Angu Walters
Country: Cameroon
Style: Surrealism
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas
Fun Fact: His interest in painting started when he was a boy experimenting with ink from different pen colors, mixed and applied them on torn cardboards, which were sometimes hung on the walls of his mother’s sitting room. His mother invited Spee, a very famous artist to show him what the child was doing with the materials he could find in his milieu, thereafter the artist took him to his workshop, under his guidance so to better improve on his skills.
Quote:
Works
1.
2. Kora Player III
3. Mask
4. The Broken Bridge
5. The Fulani. The Cow. The Milk
6.  Sunshine in my mind
7.Knowledge is Power
Angu Walters
Country: Cameroon
Style: Surrealism
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas
Fun Fact: His interest in painting started when he was a boy experimenting with ink from different pen colors, mixed and applied them on torn cardboards, which were sometimes hung on the walls of his mother’s sitting room. His mother invited Spee, a very famous artist to show him what the child was doing with the materials he could find in his milieu, thereafter the artist took him to his workshop, under his guidance so to better improve on his skills.
Quote:
Works
1.
2. Kora Player III
3. Mask
4. The Broken Bridge
5. The Fulani. The Cow. The Milk
6.  Sunshine in my mind
7.Knowledge is Power
Angu Walters
Country: Cameroon
Style: Surrealism
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas
Fun Fact: His interest in painting started when he was a boy experimenting with ink from different pen colors, mixed and applied them on torn cardboards, which were sometimes hung on the walls of his mother’s sitting room. His mother invited Spee, a very famous artist to show him what the child was doing with the materials he could find in his milieu, thereafter the artist took him to his workshop, under his guidance so to better improve on his skills.
Quote:
Works
1.
2. Kora Player III
3. Mask
4. The Broken Bridge
5. The Fulani. The Cow. The Milk
6.  Sunshine in my mind
7.Knowledge is Power
Angu Walters
Country: Cameroon
Style: Surrealism
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas
Fun Fact: His interest in painting started when he was a boy experimenting with ink from different pen colors, mixed and applied them on torn cardboards, which were sometimes hung on the walls of his mother’s sitting room. His mother invited Spee, a very famous artist to show him what the child was doing with the materials he could find in his milieu, thereafter the artist took him to his workshop, under his guidance so to better improve on his skills.
Quote:
Works
1.
2. Kora Player III
3. Mask
4. The Broken Bridge
5. The Fulani. The Cow. The Milk
6.  Sunshine in my mind
7.Knowledge is Power
Angu Walters
Country: Cameroon
Style: Surrealism
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas
Fun Fact: His interest in painting started when he was a boy experimenting with ink from different pen colors, mixed and applied them on torn cardboards, which were sometimes hung on the walls of his mother’s sitting room. His mother invited Spee, a very famous artist to show him what the child was doing with the materials he could find in his milieu, thereafter the artist took him to his workshop, under his guidance so to better improve on his skills.
Quote:
Works
1.
2. Kora Player III
3. Mask
4. The Broken Bridge
5. The Fulani. The Cow. The Milk
6.  Sunshine in my mind
7.Knowledge is Power
Angu Walters
Country: Cameroon
Style: Surrealism
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas
Fun Fact: His interest in painting started when he was a boy experimenting with ink from different pen colors, mixed and applied them on torn cardboards, which were sometimes hung on the walls of his mother’s sitting room. His mother invited Spee, a very famous artist to show him what the child was doing with the materials he could find in his milieu, thereafter the artist took him to his workshop, under his guidance so to better improve on his skills.
Quote:
Works
1.
2. Kora Player III
3. Mask
4. The Broken Bridge
5. The Fulani. The Cow. The Milk
6.  Sunshine in my mind
7.Knowledge is Power

Angu Walters

Country: Cameroon

Style: Surrealism

Medium: Acrylic on Canvas

Fun Fact: His interest in painting started when he was a boy experimenting with ink from different pen colors, mixed and applied them on torn cardboards, which were sometimes hung on the walls of his mother’s sitting room. His mother invited Spee, a very famous artist to show him what the child was doing with the materials he could find in his milieu, thereafter the artist took him to his workshop, under his guidance so to better improve on his skills.

Quote:

Works

1.

2. Kora Player III

3. Mask

4. The Broken Bridge

5. The Fulani. The Cow. The Milk

6.  Sunshine in my mind

7.Knowledge is Power

Appiah Ntiaw
Country: Ghana
Style: Figurative/Abstract
Medium: Acrylics on canvas
Fun Fact: now works for a firm dealing in leather bags and accessories in Denmark
Quote: I see myself as a motivator.  If I paint a woman carrying a pot for an example, I make it in such a way, that when one looks at my African art paintings, I try to do it in such a way that the woman looks nice and is dressed nicely.  People sometimes make Black African art such that we as African people, we look out of date, primitive, or dirty, which is an inaccurate whole perspective of Africa.  If you see my paintings, you always see Africans dressed nicely.  So I say in that way I am a motivator for self-esteem when I am depicting my people in my African art paintings.
Works
1. Lift Up
2. Day Beauty
3. The Embrace
4.
5.
6. Music Makers
7. Reclaiming our Past
8. My Twins
Appiah Ntiaw
Country: Ghana
Style: Figurative/Abstract
Medium: Acrylics on canvas
Fun Fact: now works for a firm dealing in leather bags and accessories in Denmark
Quote: I see myself as a motivator.  If I paint a woman carrying a pot for an example, I make it in such a way, that when one looks at my African art paintings, I try to do it in such a way that the woman looks nice and is dressed nicely.  People sometimes make Black African art such that we as African people, we look out of date, primitive, or dirty, which is an inaccurate whole perspective of Africa.  If you see my paintings, you always see Africans dressed nicely.  So I say in that way I am a motivator for self-esteem when I am depicting my people in my African art paintings.
Works
1. Lift Up
2. Day Beauty
3. The Embrace
4.
5.
6. Music Makers
7. Reclaiming our Past
8. My Twins
Appiah Ntiaw
Country: Ghana
Style: Figurative/Abstract
Medium: Acrylics on canvas
Fun Fact: now works for a firm dealing in leather bags and accessories in Denmark
Quote: I see myself as a motivator.  If I paint a woman carrying a pot for an example, I make it in such a way, that when one looks at my African art paintings, I try to do it in such a way that the woman looks nice and is dressed nicely.  People sometimes make Black African art such that we as African people, we look out of date, primitive, or dirty, which is an inaccurate whole perspective of Africa.  If you see my paintings, you always see Africans dressed nicely.  So I say in that way I am a motivator for self-esteem when I am depicting my people in my African art paintings.
Works
1. Lift Up
2. Day Beauty
3. The Embrace
4.
5.
6. Music Makers
7. Reclaiming our Past
8. My Twins
Appiah Ntiaw
Country: Ghana
Style: Figurative/Abstract
Medium: Acrylics on canvas
Fun Fact: now works for a firm dealing in leather bags and accessories in Denmark
Quote: I see myself as a motivator.  If I paint a woman carrying a pot for an example, I make it in such a way, that when one looks at my African art paintings, I try to do it in such a way that the woman looks nice and is dressed nicely.  People sometimes make Black African art such that we as African people, we look out of date, primitive, or dirty, which is an inaccurate whole perspective of Africa.  If you see my paintings, you always see Africans dressed nicely.  So I say in that way I am a motivator for self-esteem when I am depicting my people in my African art paintings.
Works
1. Lift Up
2. Day Beauty
3. The Embrace
4.
5.
6. Music Makers
7. Reclaiming our Past
8. My Twins
Appiah Ntiaw
Country: Ghana
Style: Figurative/Abstract
Medium: Acrylics on canvas
Fun Fact: now works for a firm dealing in leather bags and accessories in Denmark
Quote: I see myself as a motivator.  If I paint a woman carrying a pot for an example, I make it in such a way, that when one looks at my African art paintings, I try to do it in such a way that the woman looks nice and is dressed nicely.  People sometimes make Black African art such that we as African people, we look out of date, primitive, or dirty, which is an inaccurate whole perspective of Africa.  If you see my paintings, you always see Africans dressed nicely.  So I say in that way I am a motivator for self-esteem when I am depicting my people in my African art paintings.
Works
1. Lift Up
2. Day Beauty
3. The Embrace
4.
5.
6. Music Makers
7. Reclaiming our Past
8. My Twins
Appiah Ntiaw
Country: Ghana
Style: Figurative/Abstract
Medium: Acrylics on canvas
Fun Fact: now works for a firm dealing in leather bags and accessories in Denmark
Quote: I see myself as a motivator.  If I paint a woman carrying a pot for an example, I make it in such a way, that when one looks at my African art paintings, I try to do it in such a way that the woman looks nice and is dressed nicely.  People sometimes make Black African art such that we as African people, we look out of date, primitive, or dirty, which is an inaccurate whole perspective of Africa.  If you see my paintings, you always see Africans dressed nicely.  So I say in that way I am a motivator for self-esteem when I am depicting my people in my African art paintings.
Works
1. Lift Up
2. Day Beauty
3. The Embrace
4.
5.
6. Music Makers
7. Reclaiming our Past
8. My Twins
Appiah Ntiaw
Country: Ghana
Style: Figurative/Abstract
Medium: Acrylics on canvas
Fun Fact: now works for a firm dealing in leather bags and accessories in Denmark
Quote: I see myself as a motivator.  If I paint a woman carrying a pot for an example, I make it in such a way, that when one looks at my African art paintings, I try to do it in such a way that the woman looks nice and is dressed nicely.  People sometimes make Black African art such that we as African people, we look out of date, primitive, or dirty, which is an inaccurate whole perspective of Africa.  If you see my paintings, you always see Africans dressed nicely.  So I say in that way I am a motivator for self-esteem when I am depicting my people in my African art paintings.
Works
1. Lift Up
2. Day Beauty
3. The Embrace
4.
5.
6. Music Makers
7. Reclaiming our Past
8. My Twins
Appiah Ntiaw
Country: Ghana
Style: Figurative/Abstract
Medium: Acrylics on canvas
Fun Fact: now works for a firm dealing in leather bags and accessories in Denmark
Quote: I see myself as a motivator.  If I paint a woman carrying a pot for an example, I make it in such a way, that when one looks at my African art paintings, I try to do it in such a way that the woman looks nice and is dressed nicely.  People sometimes make Black African art such that we as African people, we look out of date, primitive, or dirty, which is an inaccurate whole perspective of Africa.  If you see my paintings, you always see Africans dressed nicely.  So I say in that way I am a motivator for self-esteem when I am depicting my people in my African art paintings.
Works
1. Lift Up
2. Day Beauty
3. The Embrace
4.
5.
6. Music Makers
7. Reclaiming our Past
8. My Twins

Appiah Ntiaw

Country: Ghana

Style: Figurative/Abstract

Medium: Acrylics on canvas

Fun Fact: now works for a firm dealing in leather bags and accessories in Denmark

Quote: I see myself as a motivator.  If I paint a woman carrying a pot for an example, I make it in such a way, that when one looks at my African art paintings, I try to do it in such a way that the woman looks nice and is dressed nicely.  People sometimes make Black African art such that we as African people, we look out of date, primitive, or dirty, which is an inaccurate whole perspective of Africa.  If you see my paintings, you always see Africans dressed nicely.  So I say in that way I am a motivator for self-esteem when I am depicting my people in my African art paintings.

Works

1. Lift Up

2. Day Beauty

3. The Embrace

4.

5.

6. Music Makers

7. Reclaiming our Past

8. My Twins

Kenya Robinson
Country: United STates
Style: Abstract Sculpture
Medium: Plastic combs, nylon crochet thread, plastic cable ties, nuts, and bolts/ Mixed
Fun Fact: An astute observer of culture, (Robinson) explores a range of issues from race and class to perceptions about gender, privilege, and consumerism. Her newest work places rogue installations within store displays and merchandise to emphasize the act of shopping, beginning with a Walmart in New Haven. All kinds of people encounter art every day, she explains, making this a good moment to think about the American national character and its shifting nature.
Quote:

I have been blessed with the privilege of blackness and femaleness, and sometimes, queerness on Karaoke Thursdays, or even on a regular Monday when the Rainbow is Enuf. My neighbors-in-otherness, borrowing sass and sugar from next door to spice the “T” we can all serve on the regular. I am fiscally a member of the working poor and culturally a member of the shrinking middle class. A graduate of an Ivy League University, I am also a college dropout. Go figure.

But ultimately I am an artist whose personal contradictions are not simply confusing, but fodder for my in-and-out-of-studio practice. I use social media, the comment thread cacophony of ‘the internets’, google alerts, information doppelgangers, contact microphones, contact paper, oil pastels, corduroy crotch shots, chalk, ink, combs, plastic action figures, the mythologies of identity and blonde hair as material to create experiences. Someone once told me that I was “all sparkle and no substance”. I was so shocked at it’s timing that it took nearly two hours before the tears fell, but now I think it a fitting description. You can’t hold love in your hand either. And that’s what I’m really serving. All “T”, no shade.











Why do we equate a relief of responsibility with artistic freedom?  What if serving as a spokesperson for other HUMANS (regardless of the many fictions of identity) was viewed as a privilege? What if we considered creative practice as necessarily transcendent and universal by default?  What if someone, who does not identify as white or male, was relatively unconcerned with the modes of practice or how whitemen were viewed by an audience?  What if all the aspects of identity that are described as “lesser”, “oppressed”, “minority”, “black”, “child”, “female”, “trans”, “gay”, etc. were exalted in status, and, in fact a privilege to carry?


 












Works
1. Vortex
2. Commemorative Headdress Of Her Journey Beyond Heaven
3.
4.
5.

http://kenyaworkspace.blogspot.com/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kenya-/
Kenya Robinson
Country: United STates
Style: Abstract Sculpture
Medium: Plastic combs, nylon crochet thread, plastic cable ties, nuts, and bolts/ Mixed
Fun Fact: An astute observer of culture, (Robinson) explores a range of issues from race and class to perceptions about gender, privilege, and consumerism. Her newest work places rogue installations within store displays and merchandise to emphasize the act of shopping, beginning with a Walmart in New Haven. All kinds of people encounter art every day, she explains, making this a good moment to think about the American national character and its shifting nature.
Quote:

I have been blessed with the privilege of blackness and femaleness, and sometimes, queerness on Karaoke Thursdays, or even on a regular Monday when the Rainbow is Enuf. My neighbors-in-otherness, borrowing sass and sugar from next door to spice the “T” we can all serve on the regular. I am fiscally a member of the working poor and culturally a member of the shrinking middle class. A graduate of an Ivy League University, I am also a college dropout. Go figure.

But ultimately I am an artist whose personal contradictions are not simply confusing, but fodder for my in-and-out-of-studio practice. I use social media, the comment thread cacophony of ‘the internets’, google alerts, information doppelgangers, contact microphones, contact paper, oil pastels, corduroy crotch shots, chalk, ink, combs, plastic action figures, the mythologies of identity and blonde hair as material to create experiences. Someone once told me that I was “all sparkle and no substance”. I was so shocked at it’s timing that it took nearly two hours before the tears fell, but now I think it a fitting description. You can’t hold love in your hand either. And that’s what I’m really serving. All “T”, no shade.











Why do we equate a relief of responsibility with artistic freedom?  What if serving as a spokesperson for other HUMANS (regardless of the many fictions of identity) was viewed as a privilege? What if we considered creative practice as necessarily transcendent and universal by default?  What if someone, who does not identify as white or male, was relatively unconcerned with the modes of practice or how whitemen were viewed by an audience?  What if all the aspects of identity that are described as “lesser”, “oppressed”, “minority”, “black”, “child”, “female”, “trans”, “gay”, etc. were exalted in status, and, in fact a privilege to carry?


 












Works
1. Vortex
2. Commemorative Headdress Of Her Journey Beyond Heaven
3.
4.
5.

http://kenyaworkspace.blogspot.com/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kenya-/
Kenya Robinson
Country: United STates
Style: Abstract Sculpture
Medium: Plastic combs, nylon crochet thread, plastic cable ties, nuts, and bolts/ Mixed
Fun Fact: An astute observer of culture, (Robinson) explores a range of issues from race and class to perceptions about gender, privilege, and consumerism. Her newest work places rogue installations within store displays and merchandise to emphasize the act of shopping, beginning with a Walmart in New Haven. All kinds of people encounter art every day, she explains, making this a good moment to think about the American national character and its shifting nature.
Quote:

I have been blessed with the privilege of blackness and femaleness, and sometimes, queerness on Karaoke Thursdays, or even on a regular Monday when the Rainbow is Enuf. My neighbors-in-otherness, borrowing sass and sugar from next door to spice the “T” we can all serve on the regular. I am fiscally a member of the working poor and culturally a member of the shrinking middle class. A graduate of an Ivy League University, I am also a college dropout. Go figure.

But ultimately I am an artist whose personal contradictions are not simply confusing, but fodder for my in-and-out-of-studio practice. I use social media, the comment thread cacophony of ‘the internets’, google alerts, information doppelgangers, contact microphones, contact paper, oil pastels, corduroy crotch shots, chalk, ink, combs, plastic action figures, the mythologies of identity and blonde hair as material to create experiences. Someone once told me that I was “all sparkle and no substance”. I was so shocked at it’s timing that it took nearly two hours before the tears fell, but now I think it a fitting description. You can’t hold love in your hand either. And that’s what I’m really serving. All “T”, no shade.











Why do we equate a relief of responsibility with artistic freedom?  What if serving as a spokesperson for other HUMANS (regardless of the many fictions of identity) was viewed as a privilege? What if we considered creative practice as necessarily transcendent and universal by default?  What if someone, who does not identify as white or male, was relatively unconcerned with the modes of practice or how whitemen were viewed by an audience?  What if all the aspects of identity that are described as “lesser”, “oppressed”, “minority”, “black”, “child”, “female”, “trans”, “gay”, etc. were exalted in status, and, in fact a privilege to carry?


 












Works
1. Vortex
2. Commemorative Headdress Of Her Journey Beyond Heaven
3.
4.
5.

http://kenyaworkspace.blogspot.com/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kenya-/
Kenya Robinson
Country: United STates
Style: Abstract Sculpture
Medium: Plastic combs, nylon crochet thread, plastic cable ties, nuts, and bolts/ Mixed
Fun Fact: An astute observer of culture, (Robinson) explores a range of issues from race and class to perceptions about gender, privilege, and consumerism. Her newest work places rogue installations within store displays and merchandise to emphasize the act of shopping, beginning with a Walmart in New Haven. All kinds of people encounter art every day, she explains, making this a good moment to think about the American national character and its shifting nature.
Quote:

I have been blessed with the privilege of blackness and femaleness, and sometimes, queerness on Karaoke Thursdays, or even on a regular Monday when the Rainbow is Enuf. My neighbors-in-otherness, borrowing sass and sugar from next door to spice the “T” we can all serve on the regular. I am fiscally a member of the working poor and culturally a member of the shrinking middle class. A graduate of an Ivy League University, I am also a college dropout. Go figure.

But ultimately I am an artist whose personal contradictions are not simply confusing, but fodder for my in-and-out-of-studio practice. I use social media, the comment thread cacophony of ‘the internets’, google alerts, information doppelgangers, contact microphones, contact paper, oil pastels, corduroy crotch shots, chalk, ink, combs, plastic action figures, the mythologies of identity and blonde hair as material to create experiences. Someone once told me that I was “all sparkle and no substance”. I was so shocked at it’s timing that it took nearly two hours before the tears fell, but now I think it a fitting description. You can’t hold love in your hand either. And that’s what I’m really serving. All “T”, no shade.











Why do we equate a relief of responsibility with artistic freedom?  What if serving as a spokesperson for other HUMANS (regardless of the many fictions of identity) was viewed as a privilege? What if we considered creative practice as necessarily transcendent and universal by default?  What if someone, who does not identify as white or male, was relatively unconcerned with the modes of practice or how whitemen were viewed by an audience?  What if all the aspects of identity that are described as “lesser”, “oppressed”, “minority”, “black”, “child”, “female”, “trans”, “gay”, etc. were exalted in status, and, in fact a privilege to carry?


 












Works
1. Vortex
2. Commemorative Headdress Of Her Journey Beyond Heaven
3.
4.
5.

http://kenyaworkspace.blogspot.com/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kenya-/
Kenya Robinson
Country: United STates
Style: Abstract Sculpture
Medium: Plastic combs, nylon crochet thread, plastic cable ties, nuts, and bolts/ Mixed
Fun Fact: An astute observer of culture, (Robinson) explores a range of issues from race and class to perceptions about gender, privilege, and consumerism. Her newest work places rogue installations within store displays and merchandise to emphasize the act of shopping, beginning with a Walmart in New Haven. All kinds of people encounter art every day, she explains, making this a good moment to think about the American national character and its shifting nature.
Quote:

I have been blessed with the privilege of blackness and femaleness, and sometimes, queerness on Karaoke Thursdays, or even on a regular Monday when the Rainbow is Enuf. My neighbors-in-otherness, borrowing sass and sugar from next door to spice the “T” we can all serve on the regular. I am fiscally a member of the working poor and culturally a member of the shrinking middle class. A graduate of an Ivy League University, I am also a college dropout. Go figure.

But ultimately I am an artist whose personal contradictions are not simply confusing, but fodder for my in-and-out-of-studio practice. I use social media, the comment thread cacophony of ‘the internets’, google alerts, information doppelgangers, contact microphones, contact paper, oil pastels, corduroy crotch shots, chalk, ink, combs, plastic action figures, the mythologies of identity and blonde hair as material to create experiences. Someone once told me that I was “all sparkle and no substance”. I was so shocked at it’s timing that it took nearly two hours before the tears fell, but now I think it a fitting description. You can’t hold love in your hand either. And that’s what I’m really serving. All “T”, no shade.











Why do we equate a relief of responsibility with artistic freedom?  What if serving as a spokesperson for other HUMANS (regardless of the many fictions of identity) was viewed as a privilege? What if we considered creative practice as necessarily transcendent and universal by default?  What if someone, who does not identify as white or male, was relatively unconcerned with the modes of practice or how whitemen were viewed by an audience?  What if all the aspects of identity that are described as “lesser”, “oppressed”, “minority”, “black”, “child”, “female”, “trans”, “gay”, etc. were exalted in status, and, in fact a privilege to carry?


 












Works
1. Vortex
2. Commemorative Headdress Of Her Journey Beyond Heaven
3.
4.
5.

http://kenyaworkspace.blogspot.com/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kenya-/

Kenya Robinson

Country: United STates

Style: Abstract Sculpture

Medium: Plastic combs, nylon crochet thread, plastic cable ties, nuts, and bolts/ Mixed

Fun Fact: An astute observer of culture, (Robinson) explores a range of issues from race and class to perceptions about gender, privilege, and consumerism. Her newest work places rogue installations within store displays and merchandise to emphasize the act of shopping, beginning with a Walmart in New Haven. All kinds of people encounter art every day, she explains, making this a good moment to think about the American national character and its shifting nature.

Quote:

I have been blessed with the privilege of blackness and femaleness, and sometimes, queerness on Karaoke Thursdays, or even on a regular Monday when the Rainbow is Enuf. My neighbors-in-otherness, borrowing sass and sugar from next door to spice the “T” we can all serve on the regular. I am fiscally a member of the working poor and culturally a member of the shrinking middle class. A graduate of an Ivy League University, I am also a college dropout. Go figure.
But ultimately I am an artist whose personal contradictions are not simply confusing, but fodder for my in-and-out-of-studio practice. I use social media, the comment thread cacophony of ‘the internets’, google alerts, information doppelgangers, contact microphones, contact paper, oil pastels, corduroy crotch shots, chalk, ink, combs, plastic action figures, the mythologies of identity and blonde hair as material to create experiences. Someone once told me that I was “all sparkle and no substance”. I was so shocked at it’s timing that it took nearly two hours before the tears fell, but now I think it a fitting description. You can’t hold love in your hand either. And that’s what I’m really serving. All “T”, no shade.

image
Why do we equate a relief of responsibility with artistic freedom?  What if serving as a spokesperson for other HUMANS (regardless of the many fictions of identity) was viewed as a privilege? What if we considered creative practice as necessarily transcendent and universal by default?  What if someone, who does not identify as white or male, was relatively unconcerned with the modes of practice or how whitemen were viewed by an audience?  What if all the aspects of identity that are described as “lesser”, “oppressed”, “minority”, “black”, “child”, “female”, “trans”, “gay”, etc. were exalted in status, and, in fact a privilege to carry?

Works

1. Vortex

2. Commemorative Headdress Of Her Journey Beyond Heaven

3.

4.

5.

http://kenyaworkspace.blogspot.com/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kenya-/

Mekbib Gebertsadik
Country: Ethiopia
Style: “Africanism”
Medium: Oil on Canvas
Fun Fact: His work concentrates on African motifs and traditions, both in color palette and technique. Making use of two-dimensional imagery and generous textural application, Mekbib intentionally references traditional African art forms, contributing to the establishment of a movement he calls, “Africanism.”
Quote:
Work
1. Queen of Sheba
2. Untitled
3. Evacuation
Mekbib Gebertsadik
Country: Ethiopia
Style: “Africanism”
Medium: Oil on Canvas
Fun Fact: His work concentrates on African motifs and traditions, both in color palette and technique. Making use of two-dimensional imagery and generous textural application, Mekbib intentionally references traditional African art forms, contributing to the establishment of a movement he calls, “Africanism.”
Quote:
Work
1. Queen of Sheba
2. Untitled
3. Evacuation
Mekbib Gebertsadik
Country: Ethiopia
Style: “Africanism”
Medium: Oil on Canvas
Fun Fact: His work concentrates on African motifs and traditions, both in color palette and technique. Making use of two-dimensional imagery and generous textural application, Mekbib intentionally references traditional African art forms, contributing to the establishment of a movement he calls, “Africanism.”
Quote:
Work
1. Queen of Sheba
2. Untitled
3. Evacuation

Mekbib Gebertsadik

Country: Ethiopia

Style: “Africanism”

Medium: Oil on Canvas

Fun Fact: His work concentrates on African motifs and traditions, both in color palette and technique. Making use of two-dimensional imagery and generous textural application, Mekbib intentionally references traditional African art forms, contributing to the establishment of a movement he calls, “Africanism.”

Quote:

Work

1. Queen of Sheba

2. Untitled

3. Evacuation

Ephrem Kouakou
Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast
Style: Symbolism/
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth
Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.
Quote:
Works
1. Carnival
2.MORTAL COMBAT,
3. Big Bird Blue
4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER
5. My Best Friend
My Best Friend
My Best Friend
6. Innocence
7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV
8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII
9. Four Women In Bloom
My Best Friend
Ephrem Kouakou
Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast
Style: Symbolism/
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth
Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.
Quote:
Works
1. Carnival
2.MORTAL COMBAT,
3. Big Bird Blue
4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER
5. My Best Friend
My Best Friend
My Best Friend
6. Innocence
7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV
8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII
9. Four Women In Bloom
My Best Friend
Ephrem Kouakou
Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast
Style: Symbolism/
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth
Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.
Quote:
Works
1. Carnival
2.MORTAL COMBAT,
3. Big Bird Blue
4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER
5. My Best Friend
My Best Friend
My Best Friend
6. Innocence
7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV
8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII
9. Four Women In Bloom
My Best Friend
Ephrem Kouakou
Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast
Style: Symbolism/
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth
Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.
Quote:
Works
1. Carnival
2.MORTAL COMBAT,
3. Big Bird Blue
4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER
5. My Best Friend
My Best Friend
My Best Friend
6. Innocence
7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV
8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII
9. Four Women In Bloom
My Best Friend
Ephrem Kouakou
Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast
Style: Symbolism/
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth
Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.
Quote:
Works
1. Carnival
2.MORTAL COMBAT,
3. Big Bird Blue
4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER
5. My Best Friend
My Best Friend
My Best Friend
6. Innocence
7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV
8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII
9. Four Women In Bloom
My Best Friend
Ephrem Kouakou
Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast
Style: Symbolism/
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth
Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.
Quote:
Works
1. Carnival
2.MORTAL COMBAT,
3. Big Bird Blue
4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER
5. My Best Friend
My Best Friend
My Best Friend
6. Innocence
7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV
8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII
9. Four Women In Bloom
My Best Friend
Ephrem Kouakou
Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast
Style: Symbolism/
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth
Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.
Quote:
Works
1. Carnival
2.MORTAL COMBAT,
3. Big Bird Blue
4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER
5. My Best Friend
My Best Friend
My Best Friend
6. Innocence
7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV
8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII
9. Four Women In Bloom
My Best Friend
Ephrem Kouakou
Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast
Style: Symbolism/
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth
Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.
Quote:
Works
1. Carnival
2.MORTAL COMBAT,
3. Big Bird Blue
4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER
5. My Best Friend
My Best Friend
My Best Friend
6. Innocence
7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV
8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII
9. Four Women In Bloom
My Best Friend
Ephrem Kouakou
Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast
Style: Symbolism/
Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth
Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.
Quote:
Works
1. Carnival
2.MORTAL COMBAT,
3. Big Bird Blue
4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER
5. My Best Friend
My Best Friend
My Best Friend
6. Innocence
7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV
8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII
9. Four Women In Bloom
My Best Friend

Ephrem Kouakou

Country: Cote D’Ivoire/ Ivory Coast

Style: Symbolism/

Medium: Acrylic on Canvas/African Cloth

Fun Fact: As a young man he trained to be a medicine man, participating in many initiation rites. This actualized a deep spiritual life that manifests in his work. Themes of community, the spiritual power of masks, protective spirits, and animal guides, are reflections of an unseen world that brings a deeper meaning to our lives. When he was 17 years old, Ephrem walked over 2500 miles from his Ivory Coast village to Algeria, a journey which took over three months. He then made his way to France, where he studied at France’s best art academies, including L’Ecole des Beaux Arts, Angers (1981-1982), Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Aix-en Provence, (1982-1983) and École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (1984-1986), where he graduated with honors. His works on both canvas and paper are noted for their highly saturated, intense color, achieved by mixing raw pigment powders into glue.

Quote:

Works

1. Carnival

2.MORTAL COMBAT,

3. Big Bird Blue

4. HOMAGE TO CHRISTIAN LATTIER

5. My Best Friend

My Best Friend
My Best Friend

6. Innocence

7.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lV

8.YOUNG WOMAN FROM THE VILLAGE lII

9. Four Women In Bloom

My Best Friend

Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html
Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html
Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html
Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html
Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html
Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html
Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html
Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html
Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html
Hubert Jackson
Country: United States
Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative
Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.
Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.
Quote:
Work
1. Sunspiration
2. Planes of Existence
3. Monroe Bay No. 18
4. Untitled
5. Monroe Bay No.17
6. Another Time, Another Place
7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union
8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek
9. The Matriach
10. Louisiana Blues
http://www.hubertjackson.com
http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html

Hubert Jackson

Country: United States

Style: Abstract/ Expressionist/ Figurative

Medium: Acrylic/Mixed Media on Canvas

Fun Fact: Jackson’s paintings feature highly textured multi-colored planes which are inspired by the mountains, valleys, fields, woodlands, wetlands, minerals and vegetation of his native Virginia. Some of Jackson’s paintings such as Shoal, Shenandoah, and Mist relate directly to his reaction to particular moments and specific locations. Other works like Frost, Moss, and Quartz capture the spirit and essence of nature’s raw components.

Jackson employs heavy applications of acrylic paint, acrylic gel and an array of found natural and man-made materials such as tree bark, grasses, sand and fabrics.

Quote:

Work

1. Sunspiration

2. Planes of Existence

3. Monroe Bay No. 18

4. Untitled

5. Monroe Bay No.17

6. Another Time, Another Place

7. Charlie Wright, The Runaway Slave Who Saved the Union

8. Spirits of Pope’s Creek

9. The Matriach

10. Louisiana Blues

http://www.hubertjackson.com

http://www.fineartleasingintl.com/jackson-gallery.html

Chipika Simanwe
Country: Zambia
Style: Impressionist, Realism
Medium: Oil, mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact:  Chipika ‘s work has developed steadily over the years allowing a passage of an initiate into the fold of mainstream art. His earlier experiments have paid off with further exploration in his new body of work he refers ‘Red Handed’ , its clear that he has been researching to take his style further than the previous collections, this time has come more with lively colourful images in two fold, semi realistic expressions and abstract manifestations
Quote:
Works
1. Nyau Symphony
2. Chimbayambaya 2 (Wreck)
3.Very Wrecked
4. Entertainers of Mize
5. Kuomboka Fever
6. I Used to own a  bus
7. Solitude at Altitude
http://www.chipika.com/
Chipika Simanwe
Country: Zambia
Style: Impressionist, Realism
Medium: Oil, mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact:  Chipika ‘s work has developed steadily over the years allowing a passage of an initiate into the fold of mainstream art. His earlier experiments have paid off with further exploration in his new body of work he refers ‘Red Handed’ , its clear that he has been researching to take his style further than the previous collections, this time has come more with lively colourful images in two fold, semi realistic expressions and abstract manifestations
Quote:
Works
1. Nyau Symphony
2. Chimbayambaya 2 (Wreck)
3.Very Wrecked
4. Entertainers of Mize
5. Kuomboka Fever
6. I Used to own a  bus
7. Solitude at Altitude
http://www.chipika.com/
Chipika Simanwe
Country: Zambia
Style: Impressionist, Realism
Medium: Oil, mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact:  Chipika ‘s work has developed steadily over the years allowing a passage of an initiate into the fold of mainstream art. His earlier experiments have paid off with further exploration in his new body of work he refers ‘Red Handed’ , its clear that he has been researching to take his style further than the previous collections, this time has come more with lively colourful images in two fold, semi realistic expressions and abstract manifestations
Quote:
Works
1. Nyau Symphony
2. Chimbayambaya 2 (Wreck)
3.Very Wrecked
4. Entertainers of Mize
5. Kuomboka Fever
6. I Used to own a  bus
7. Solitude at Altitude
http://www.chipika.com/
Chipika Simanwe
Country: Zambia
Style: Impressionist, Realism
Medium: Oil, mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact:  Chipika ‘s work has developed steadily over the years allowing a passage of an initiate into the fold of mainstream art. His earlier experiments have paid off with further exploration in his new body of work he refers ‘Red Handed’ , its clear that he has been researching to take his style further than the previous collections, this time has come more with lively colourful images in two fold, semi realistic expressions and abstract manifestations
Quote:
Works
1. Nyau Symphony
2. Chimbayambaya 2 (Wreck)
3.Very Wrecked
4. Entertainers of Mize
5. Kuomboka Fever
6. I Used to own a  bus
7. Solitude at Altitude
http://www.chipika.com/
Chipika Simanwe
Country: Zambia
Style: Impressionist, Realism
Medium: Oil, mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact:  Chipika ‘s work has developed steadily over the years allowing a passage of an initiate into the fold of mainstream art. His earlier experiments have paid off with further exploration in his new body of work he refers ‘Red Handed’ , its clear that he has been researching to take his style further than the previous collections, this time has come more with lively colourful images in two fold, semi realistic expressions and abstract manifestations
Quote:
Works
1. Nyau Symphony
2. Chimbayambaya 2 (Wreck)
3.Very Wrecked
4. Entertainers of Mize
5. Kuomboka Fever
6. I Used to own a  bus
7. Solitude at Altitude
http://www.chipika.com/
Chipika Simanwe
Country: Zambia
Style: Impressionist, Realism
Medium: Oil, mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact:  Chipika ‘s work has developed steadily over the years allowing a passage of an initiate into the fold of mainstream art. His earlier experiments have paid off with further exploration in his new body of work he refers ‘Red Handed’ , its clear that he has been researching to take his style further than the previous collections, this time has come more with lively colourful images in two fold, semi realistic expressions and abstract manifestations
Quote:
Works
1. Nyau Symphony
2. Chimbayambaya 2 (Wreck)
3.Very Wrecked
4. Entertainers of Mize
5. Kuomboka Fever
6. I Used to own a  bus
7. Solitude at Altitude
http://www.chipika.com/
Chipika Simanwe
Country: Zambia
Style: Impressionist, Realism
Medium: Oil, mixed Media on Canvas
Fun Fact:  Chipika ‘s work has developed steadily over the years allowing a passage of an initiate into the fold of mainstream art. His earlier experiments have paid off with further exploration in his new body of work he refers ‘Red Handed’ , its clear that he has been researching to take his style further than the previous collections, this time has come more with lively colourful images in two fold, semi realistic expressions and abstract manifestations
Quote:
Works
1. Nyau Symphony
2. Chimbayambaya 2 (Wreck)
3.Very Wrecked
4. Entertainers of Mize
5. Kuomboka Fever
6. I Used to own a  bus
7. Solitude at Altitude
http://www.chipika.com/

Chipika Simanwe

Country: Zambia

Style: Impressionist, Realism

Medium: Oil, mixed Media on Canvas

Fun Fact:  Chipika ‘s work has developed steadily over the years allowing a passage of an initiate into the fold of mainstream art. His earlier experiments have paid off with further exploration in his new body of work he refers ‘Red Handed’ , its clear that he has been researching to take his style further than the previous collections, this time has come more with lively colourful images in two fold, semi realistic expressions and abstract manifestations

Quote:

Works

1. Nyau Symphony

2. Chimbayambaya 2 (Wreck)

3.Very Wrecked

4. Entertainers of Mize

5. Kuomboka Fever

6. I Used to own a  bus

7. Solitude at Altitude

http://www.chipika.com/

Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/
Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/
Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/
Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/
Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/
Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/
Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/
Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/
Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/
Lombe Nsama
Country: Zambia
Style: figurative, expressionist
Medium: Acrylics on Canvas
Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.
Quote:
Works
1.Clad In National Colours
2. Pondering
3. Tattoo Master
4. School Girls
5. My Yellow Socks
6. Harmony in Play
7. Interview
8. Untitled
9. Footballer
10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at
http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/

Lombe Nsama

Country: Zambia

Style: figurative, expressionist

Medium: Acrylics on Canvas

Fun Fact: Lombe Nsama is one of the most active emerging art teacher and practicing artist, whose art has gained a significant recognition of style and content. Lombe has developed his insight of advancing his career with wide exposure in many artistic ventures. He has over the years been active in organizing young artists’ workshops and exhibitions.

Quote:

Works

1.Clad In National Colours

2. Pondering

3. Tattoo Master

4. School Girls

5. My Yellow Socks

6. Harmony in Play

7. Interview

8. Untitled

9. Footballer

10.Fill My Cup Too

Show him some love at

http://lombensama.wordpress.com/view-artworks/